Autism Today
autism vocational training

Autism Vocational Training for Life Transitions

Transition from one life stage to another is usually challenging for most people. But it often becomes more difficult for children on the autism spectrum disorder spectrum and their families.

Individuals having autism rely heavily on patterns, routines, and similar things. A change in their lifestyle or schedule could be very challenging for them. A big life change, like graduating from school or college, or starting a new job is particularly complicated. To ease the stress which often accompanies such situations, preparatory activities should be carried out to instill confidence among people with autism. Autism vocational training programs can do a lot in this regard.

The Tricky Path to Autism Employment

Vocational programs provide individuals with autism an opportunity to experience practical learning in several fields. Autism vocational training is more focused towards young adults who will transition into their new job. Vocational programs extend a workplace environment to job aspirants by offering mentorship and/or internship. These programs are often tailored for particular job types and roles.

Job Skills Training for the Uniquely-Abled

While individualized training programs are the best for children who will transition to a preschool environment from their homes, autism vocational training programs are necessary for those who will move from one stage in life to another. At the same time, support from parents, teachers, friends, peers, and siblings, play a crucial role in the transition.

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About author

Prabuddha Neogi

Foodie, lazy, bookworm, and internet junkie. All in that order. Loves to floor the accelerator. Mad about the Himalayas and its trekking trails. Former life forester. Also an occasional writer and editor

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