Autism Today
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ASD children activity

Tips to Choose an ASD Children Activity

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) need fun activities that are both challenging and fun at the same time. Autistic children need to do this on a regular basis. But the challenge for most parents, educators and caregivers is to find the proper ASD children activity that offers the right balance of fun and learning.

Social Skills Activities for ASD Children

Here are some tips to choose the right ASD children activity.

  • Handpick a child from the group of participants. Identify the children who can be particularly helpful to the child with autism. Monitor all the participants and hunt for children who may try to ridicule and may even bully the autistic child.
  • Before you begin the ASD children activity, factor in the potential challenges you are likely to come across. You have to anticipate some of the major issues that may arise, like routine changes, sensory overload and social breakdowns. You have to ensure that the autistic child fully participates and enjoys the activity.
  • Consider games and toys that are particularly designed to engage kids on the spectrum. This is because these address specific goals. These activities can be a part of an autistic child’s individualized education plan (IEP), goals of the teacher or parent, or areas where the child himself/herself likes to work.
  • Wherever possible, use the child’s special interests to keep him/her engaged in the activity. For instance, if the child loves outer space, you can design a space-themed activity.

Animal-Assisted Therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Regardless of the fun activity you choose, keeping an autistic child engaged is quite a challenge for both the teacher and the parent. With proper practice and enough of great activities, these types of interaction would only get easier. Remember that each ASD children activity will help the child learn to communicate and connect to people around him/her. In this way, autistic children they will be more comfortable in social situations.

The information and opinions shared in each article represent the point of view of the author of the article and may not necessarily be endorsed by Autism Today or Rangam.

About author

Prabuddha Neogi

Foodie, lazy, bookworm, and internet junkie. All in that order. Loves to floor the accelerator. Mad about the Himalayas and its trekking trails. Former life forester. Also an occasional writer and editor

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