Autism Today
special needs advocacy

Special Needs Advocacy for Children

Parents of special needs children usually have to combine several roles. These include therapist, caregiver, chauffer, chef, tutor, and many others. The list is seemingly endless. But one of the most important and powerful roles that a parent of a special needs child can play is that of advocacy.

Special needs advocacy is important for several reasons. It draws attention to the injustice or unfair treatment meted out to uniquely-abled children. It also helps children and young adults who are slipping through the system to get recognition and access to resources for uniquely-abled individuals. Advocacy helps people to unite and strive for a common cause. But most important of all, it helps the special needs child get the care, services and benefits that he/she requires to perform to their full potential. Many uniquely-abled children have the capacity to perform well in life. But they lose out because their abilities are not properly promoted.

Autism Vocational Training for Life Transitions

A parent will know his/her child the best. As a result, none can take up advocacy activities better than a parent. As your child begins the transition into adulthood, it’s important that you pass on these advocacy skills to them. Teach your child how to be an advocate of his/her own self. This will help them to become more aware of their capabilities. Your child will get the knowledge to succeed in life and shine in life.

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About author

Prabuddha Neogi

Foodie, lazy, bookworm, and internet junkie. All in that order. Loves to floor the accelerator. Mad about the Himalayas and its trekking trails. Former life forester. Also an occasional writer and editor

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