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autistic teens

Fun Activities for Autistic Teens

Like we already said before, the number of children affected with autism spectrum disorder is growing every year. It’s conservatively estimated that at least one in every 68 children in the US has autism. These kids grow up to be autistic teens and have to often struggle with their social skills and communication. They also lack in their executive functioning and planning aspects.

Activities that promote language and speaking skills among autistic teens, can help in strengthening the child’s ability to forge communication with their peers and adults. Sequencing activities help autistic teens plan their daily schedule, both at home and in school.

Fun Activities for ASD Children

Here are some fun activities that you may try out for your autistic child to adapt to social situations.

Blindfold obstacle course: You can set up an obstacle course that will challenge kids to move over, under and around various objects. You may ask the children to work in pairs, with one of them wearing a blindfold. The other child has to give directions to the blindfolded child and help him/her negotiate through the entire course. It’s a great activity that works on the theory of mind.

Social Skills Activities for ASD Children

Movie listening quiz: It’s usually a challenge for autistic teens to concentrate on the words of others, particularly when there are enough distractions. Play a movie scene on your tab and quiz them how much interaction they managed to pickup. Ask questions about the characters in the movie and their facial expressions. Many apps for autistic children have interactive programs that enhance a child’s comprehension skills.

Improvisational skits: Have the children work in a group. Give them a prop, maybe a clipboard, or a steering wheel and a pair of pants. The kids can work on their improvisational skills and come up with something new. Such activities will help them to encourage collaboration and break routines.

The information and opinions shared in each article represent the point of view of the author of the article and may not necessarily be endorsed by Autism Today or Rangam.

About author

Prabuddha Neogi

Foodie, lazy, bookworm, and internet junkie. All in that order. Loves to floor the accelerator. Mad about the Himalayas and its trekking trails. Former life forester. Also an occasional writer and editor

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